Need a little help in your math class? Join MATHLIVE!

written by Georgia Schumacher 18 September 2014

Math problemThe Art Institute of Pittsburgh – Online Division prides itself on the student support provided by our staff and faculty alike. Our admissions representatives, academic counselors, students finance counselors, librarians, and tutors are always there to lend a helping hand. Our newest addition to our extensive academic support offering includes our new MATH1010 webinar series MATH LIVE!, held twice weekly on Mondays and Thursdays.

Each MATH LIVE! webinar is a 60-minute informal study session with a full-time math faculty member. In these weekly sessions, you can ask math questions, enrich your grasp on the class material and gain useful assignment guidance. By attending a MATHLIVE!, you can receive 5 bonus points, with the possibility to earn a maximum of 10 points toward your total points for the course.

Come prepared with specific questions, such as “Can you show me how to factor “x^2+5x+4?”, so that you make the most of your time in the session. All questions are welcome but more general questions (such “I don’t understand quadratic equations. Can you help me?”) are difficult to answer in a short period of time.

How to Register

Sessions are open on Monday evenings at 7:30 PM ET and on Thursday mornings at 11:00AM ET. If you’re interested in attending, register here to reserve your webinar seat. After registering, you’ll receive a confirmation email with information needed to join the webinar.

For more upcoming events, visit our Events calendar in the Campus Common.

Behind the Runway: The Business of Fashion Marketing

written by Georgia Schumacher 16 September 2014

Clothing on display

When it comes to careers in fashion, there are a myriad of choices for those who want to claim their place in the fashion scene without becoming designers. Whether the retail, media, or public relations aspects appeal to you, a career in fashion marketing can take you where you want to go. As a fashion marketer, you can take on a wide variety of duties related to branding, sales, promotions, customer relations and event planning. These careers are great for social butterflies who want to share their passion for the fashion industry with the world.

What is fashion marketing anyway?

As in any industry, marketing is key to the success of all fashion businesses. Both retail outlets and design houses hire marketing teams to manage their brands, plan events, set retail store layouts and work with customers. Being a fashion marketer is all about supporting the work of designers and fashion brands by showing the latest and greatest in fashion to consumers and retail stores.

Professionals who work in this field know how to conduct consumer research, measure the popularity of new trends, and design marketing campaigns that bring big results. Of course, not all fashion marketers work for huge design houses or major stores. Because marketing is essential at every level of the fashion industry, many people in this field also work for smaller boutiques and individual fashion designers.

Marketing career paths for fashion pros

One of the most exciting aspects of a marketing career is the multitude of options it affords. Instead of being confined to one type of job, fashion marketers can take on many different responsibilities. Picking an area of focus is all about deciding which of the following positions meet your talents, skills, and professional goals. Remember that the following are popular positions in the fashion field, but they're not the only careers in fashion marketing by a long shot!

Shopper

Merchandise Coordinator. Merchandise coordinators are responsible for managing a brand's products in retail outlets. They may simply set up display designs and priorities to be shared with visual merchandisers in other stores, or they may be responsible for setting up displays on their own. Depending on the size of the company, merchandise coordinators may also be expected to do some online brand management such as social media marketing and photo uploads to company websites.

Retail Manager. Retail outlets make up the biggest sector in the fashion industry, and management jobs in such outlets tend to employ experienced fashion marketers. Those students who are just completing a fashion degree program may be prepared to enter the workforce as assistant managers while those with more on-the-ground experience may be able to win store or regional management positions. These professionals are responsible for overseeing every aspect of a retail store's operations from merchandising to staffing to brand management.

Buyer. No matter the size of the retail outlet, fashion businesses rely on buyers to hunt down the season's latest trends, negotiate purchase prices, and choose merchandise for a store. Large retail outlets generally have a team of buyers, and each buyer may be responsible only for certain items. For instance, there may be separate buyers for women's wear, men's wear, and accessories. Smaller retail outlets generally employ only one buyer or require managers to handle buyer duties. Buyers are responsible for not only understanding current trends but also for introducing them to consumers.

Sales and Events Promoter. Special events and sales provide a key way for businesses to get the word out about breaking trends and attract new consumers. While some fashion companies may use a freelance event planner to manage events, others prefer to hire professionals who have industry-specific experience.

Merchandise Planner. Also known as visual planners or visual merchandisers, merchandise planners are responsible for designing displays in retail stores. They decide how clothing and accessories will be displayed on tables, stands and racks. Depending on where they work, merchandise planners may also be responsible for ensuring that their store is following any company-wide visual display standards or planograms.

Media Planner/Buyer. Digital and online marketing are just as important to today's fashion businesses as in-person marketing is in retail stores. Media planners and buyers are responsible for designing a media marketing program and buying space in print publications, online outlets and on other media such as billboards in order to advertise or promote a company’s products. Professionals in these roles are responsible both for planning and budgeting, so a solid understanding of business finance is key.

Is a fashion marketing career right for you?

Marketing careers offer one of the most promising means of entering the fashion industry. Thanks to the many different hats that fashion marketers can wear, both new and seasoned professionals can pursue a wide variety of job roles that meet their educational accomplishments and personal preferences.

If you're considering a career as a fashion marketer, remember that it's essential that you enjoy working with people. You'll spend a great deal of time interacting with company leaders, fashion industry insiders and consumers as you plan, launch, and manage marketing campaigns.

Careers in marketing are also desirable for those who want to eventually own their own fashion businesses. A solid foundation in marketing provides the knowledge needed to launch a brand or consulting service. Learn more about fashion marketing and the programs available in this area today!

What’s New at The Art Institutes

written by Georgia Schumacher 8 September 2014

AiMBFW banner

Students & Grads Debut Their Collections at Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week


Imagine you're an aspiring fashion designer. You've worked for months creating your very own collection and you're ready to reveal it on the runway. Now imagine that runway is at New York City's world renowned Lincoln Center, and the show is Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week - NYC's biggest media event. This dream will turn into reality for 13 students and graduates of The Art Institute of New York City on Tuesday, September 9, 2014.

With guidance from our experienced faculty, they created world-class collections, and our partnership with Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week will give them the chance to unveil their work on an international stage. We invite you to meet these students and alumni and to join us as they debut their lines.

Watch the live show here on Tuesday, September 9 at 8pm EST and join the conversation on Twitter and Facebook with #AiMBFW.

GETCreative Courses Introduced for Adults and Teens

GETCreative logo
The Art Institute of Pittsburgh and The Art Institute of California—San Diego, a campus of Argosy University, invite teens and adults to take their creative talents to the next level through our GETCreative courses, workshops, and special events.

Participants may choose from a variety of courses designed for the pursuit of casual recreational learning or professional development designed for adults in creative careers. The classes take place in our professional kitchens, studios, and labs—providing hands-on training on industry standard tools and technology.

Creative writing workshops, an introduction to digital single-lens reflex (DSLR) photography, garment construction classes, comic book art drawing, game design workshops, and a day in the sushi kitchen are examples of the creative outlets GETCreative provides. Classes begin this month and are offered in the following areas:

- Art Foundations
- Culinary Arts
- Recording Arts
- Creative Writing
- Design
- Photography
- Textiles
- Fashion and Jewelry
- The Business of Art
- Software for Designers

Classes meet for as few as one—or as many as six—sessions.

“Our seasoned instructors guide students to challenge their creativity in a relaxed environment.” said George Sebolt, president of The Art Institute of Pittsburgh. “Teens can test out possible career paths while still in high school, and seasoned professionals can gain skills to help them advance in the creative marketplace.”

For more information about GETCreative, to see a list of courses, or to register for classes, please visit http://getcreative.artinstitutes.edu/pittsburgh/ or http://getcreative.artinstitutes.edu/sandiego/.

An Interview with Artist Brian McCall, part 2 of 2

written by Editor Georgia Schumacher 14 August 2014

Interview conducted by Mary Clare (MC)
Graphic Design Faculty Member
Published as part of the Artist Interview Series

Brian McCall (BM) is an artist who uses a variety of media to tell his stories. See part 1 of this interview here.

Artwork: The Band

Tim Gruber 3

Herd of Philosophers, detail image

MC: What role does the artist have in society?
BM: This portends the question of the meaning of life. The one aspect of being an artist that I cherish is 'I get to make things' that have never been seen before. Ernest Becker says the artist makes an object and throws it into the abyss and hopes it makes a difference. That's all we have, the hope that it makes a difference. We make things.

Art, Titled: The Snake in Any Story

MC: Did you ever have an idea that you rendered in one medium that you would like to redo in another? Why?
BM: Decisions have to be made, failures happen all the time, so you begin again. Sometimes you pick up a different tool and begin the process again.

MC: How would you describe your creative process, and approach to creating/designing?
BM: Regurgitation. Look at what comes up and see if there's anything new and spewed on the paper. Keep an open mind to your limitations; smile and jump back into the process.

MC: What has been your creative inspiration with type and other areas?
BM: There's a lot of comic artist in me. I enjoy balloons and words popping out. I'm a great admirer of the modern comic and the layout of a dynamic page.

MC: What have been your artistic influences?
BM: Marisio Lazansky's 'Nazi Drawings

MC: What’s the best piece of advice you’ve been given?
BM: Keep track of every pitch. Try to discern the pattern of the catcher and pitcher and how they're pitching to you.

MC: Who or what is your muse?
BM: Keith Jarret and his Sun Bear Concerts

MC: What new type of projects do you have in the works?
BM: The importance of being no one, size makes no difference says Masters and Johnson, and animation.

MC: Describe yourself in three words.
BM: Self reflectively blind

MC: What advice would you give a student studying art and design?
BM: Don't please anyone else, please yourself. Just be honest and hold yourself to the highest standard.

View more of Brian’s work at http://www.flickr.com/photos/brianmccall/.

5 Simple Ways Your Site Can Be More User-Friendly

written by Georgia Schumacher 6 August 2014

Nowadays, how your website looks and performs is every bit as important as what it actually says. If your site is easy to navigate, with text that's easy to read and sharp images that load quickly, visitors are much more likely to hang around and partake in whatever it is you offer -- whether it be your art school portfolio, your resume, or a blog for your photography class. Keep reading for ideas on how to make your site as user-friendly as possible.

1. Keep it short and simple

Today's Internet users have an attention span that's one second shorter than that of your average goldfish (no joke!). If you want to get and keep their attention, you're going to have to keep your content short and sweet. There's still room for personality -- just keep in mind that the shorter the text on a given webpage, the more likely it is that somebody will actually read it.

2. Break it up

Internet users love content that's easy to scan -- so ditch the long, continuous blocks of text in favor of short paragraphs, with headings, subheadings and bullet or numbered lists to make the page scannable. Use white space on the page to set off key elements.

3. Keep it speedy

Multimedia is tops -- unless it slows your website's load time so much that your visitors get bored and click away. Remember: shorter attention span than a goldfish. Minimize your multimedia to maximize its impact -- try choosing and showcasing only the best of the best. Once you've selected your showpieces, compress the image and video files for faster loading.

4. Update regularly

Nothing sinks a user experience faster than broken links or out-of-date content. Check your site for broken links at least once a month (more if some links prove problematic), update your FAQs, and refresh seasonal or time-sensitive content in a timely manner.

5. Be mobile-friendly

A site that looks great on a desktop computer might be impossible to read or navigate on a smartphone or tablet. Optimizing your website for both mobile and desktop use is a sure way to drive more traffic your way, and keep the visitors happy once they're there.

There's no denying that an eye for art and design can help you design an attractive, user-friendly webpage (and attending art school can help you improve that already existing talent)-- but if you're stumped for ideas, all you really have to do is log out of your admin panel and browse the site as if you've never seen it before. Ask yourself the questions a first-time user might ask. If the answers aren't readily (and obviously) accessible, you've found a great place to start improving the overall user experience.