Need a little help in your math class? Join MATHLIVE!

written by Georgia Schumacher 18 September 2014

Math problemThe Art Institute of Pittsburgh – Online Division prides itself on the student support provided by our staff and faculty alike. Our admissions representatives, academic counselors, students finance counselors, librarians, and tutors are always there to lend a helping hand. Our newest addition to our extensive academic support offering includes our new MATH1010 webinar series MATH LIVE!, held twice weekly on Mondays and Thursdays.

Each MATH LIVE! webinar is a 60-minute informal study session with a full-time math faculty member. In these weekly sessions, you can ask math questions, enrich your grasp on the class material and gain useful assignment guidance. By attending a MATHLIVE!, you can receive 5 bonus points, with the possibility to earn a maximum of 10 points toward your total points for the course.

Come prepared with specific questions, such as “Can you show me how to factor “x^2+5x+4?”, so that you make the most of your time in the session. All questions are welcome but more general questions (such “I don’t understand quadratic equations. Can you help me?”) are difficult to answer in a short period of time.

How to Register

Sessions are open on Monday evenings at 7:30 PM ET and on Thursday mornings at 11:00AM ET. If you’re interested in attending, register here to reserve your webinar seat. After registering, you’ll receive a confirmation email with information needed to join the webinar.

For more upcoming events, visit our Events calendar in the Campus Common.

Accessibility and Attracting a Larger Audience for Your Video Game

written by Georgia Schumacher 10 September 2014

It's relatively easy for creative minds such as game developers to think, "Am I creating the next Skyrim or Temple Run?" Yet the majority of games, whether indie or mainstream, are far from this narrow criteria. Before breathing life into your project, ask yourself a finer question: who needs accessibility? If reaching a wider audience is a part of your goal, read these tips on how to successfully integrate simple features into your game.

1. Focus on a Specific Constraint

Every game is built to test the skills of its players in a genuine way; dynamically mapped controls or even perfectly timed, auditory cues mean the difference between "GAME OVER" and saving the princess.

While you’re in the development stage, creating accessibility options should come naturally as you decide how your game will challenge users and the different levels at which it makes sense to challenge these individuals. For example, an intense RPG (role-playing game) deserves a feature that decreases the overall difficulty of each level or the complexity of the in-game economy, if at all possible, for those who have cognitive issues.

2. Test, Test and Test Some More

There is no better way to decide if a new option is useful for its intended audience than by testing it on those who need it; gather a group of hopeful players, watch them play and let them unleash their critiques. Seeing a gamer struggle with a puzzle or task will certainly shape future progress.

3. Shout It from the Rooftops

Advertising is the most crucial part of getting others to experience the features you've worked tirelessly on. To date, very few games make it apparent that accessibility options even exist within the settings. For those shopping for such features, it becomes a difficult treasure hunt. Tell others about what you've made, and the good reviews should start to pile up.

4. It's a Perspective, Not an Impairment

No matter what may hold back a person from experiencing certain aspects of life, there is still a gaming fiend within everyone. More importantly, if a game designer rightfully assumes that any one of their future users may have an issue with coordination, hearing, cognition or vision, simply working with that in mind could make the final product more attractive to all — even if it means taking a little more time to add in a few extra settings that provide clearer fonts, reconfigured controls, or an array of difficulty levels.

Sources: http://igda-gasig.org/ | http://gameaccessibilityguidelines.com/

What’s New at The Art Institutes

written by Georgia Schumacher 8 September 2014

AiMBFW banner

Students & Grads Debut Their Collections at Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week


Imagine you're an aspiring fashion designer. You've worked for months creating your very own collection and you're ready to reveal it on the runway. Now imagine that runway is at New York City's world renowned Lincoln Center, and the show is Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week - NYC's biggest media event. This dream will turn into reality for 13 students and graduates of The Art Institute of New York City on Tuesday, September 9, 2014.

With guidance from our experienced faculty, they created world-class collections, and our partnership with Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week will give them the chance to unveil their work on an international stage. We invite you to meet these students and alumni and to join us as they debut their lines.

Watch the live show here on Tuesday, September 9 at 8pm EST and join the conversation on Twitter and Facebook with #AiMBFW.

GETCreative Courses Introduced for Adults and Teens

GETCreative logo
The Art Institute of Pittsburgh and The Art Institute of California—San Diego, a campus of Argosy University, invite teens and adults to take their creative talents to the next level through our GETCreative courses, workshops, and special events.

Participants may choose from a variety of courses designed for the pursuit of casual recreational learning or professional development designed for adults in creative careers. The classes take place in our professional kitchens, studios, and labs—providing hands-on training on industry standard tools and technology.

Creative writing workshops, an introduction to digital single-lens reflex (DSLR) photography, garment construction classes, comic book art drawing, game design workshops, and a day in the sushi kitchen are examples of the creative outlets GETCreative provides. Classes begin this month and are offered in the following areas:

- Art Foundations
- Culinary Arts
- Recording Arts
- Creative Writing
- Design
- Photography
- Textiles
- Fashion and Jewelry
- The Business of Art
- Software for Designers

Classes meet for as few as one—or as many as six—sessions.

“Our seasoned instructors guide students to challenge their creativity in a relaxed environment.” said George Sebolt, president of The Art Institute of Pittsburgh. “Teens can test out possible career paths while still in high school, and seasoned professionals can gain skills to help them advance in the creative marketplace.”

For more information about GETCreative, to see a list of courses, or to register for classes, please visit http://getcreative.artinstitutes.edu/pittsburgh/ or http://getcreative.artinstitutes.edu/sandiego/.

Accessibility Basics for Web Designers

written by Georgia Schumacher 4 September 2014

Accessibility is a word you'll probably hear a lot a lot when studying web design. It's a lot more than just a buzzword, though; accessibility is an important design element for every site. Designing a site without considering accessibility tools can mean missing out on a large potential audience.

What is accessibility?

The level of accessibility of a website or web application is determined by how accessible the web product is for those with disabilities. For example, a CAPTCHA authorization may allow users to have the code said aloud for sight-impaired visitors. Other examples of accessibility are:

• Using high-contrast design elements and larger fonts for those with visual impairments
• Offering audio content for the sight-impaired
• Subtitles for video content for the hearing-impaired
• Easy navigation for those with physical impairments that require voice commands instead of mouse navigation

Why is accessibility important?

Including accessibility design features is more than just being considerate; it’s smart business. For a site to reach its potential and meet desired performance metrics, you’ll want to reach as many people as possible. Without accessibility considerations, a site misses out on a huge portion of potential users and consumers. It is estimated that 15.5 million potential customers have some sort of disability that may require accessibility site components.

How can you improve site accessibility?

As mentioned above, there are many ways to make a site more accessible. Here are some more ways to add functionality for all:

1. Add alt tags to images and title tags to links. This allows interpretation software to read the tags to the visitor, so that the visitor knows what the link or photo is about.

2. Add video transcripts to pages with video so those who are hearing impaired can understand the video content.

3. Build navigation that allows users who don't use a mouse to tab easily from area to area and allows for easy scrolling using the arrow keys.

4. Enable auto-completion options on forms so those with limited body movement can fill out information on the site more easily.

5. Ensure that all site design works well with assistive technology.

To ensure that all design bases are covered, a site should be compliant with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG). These guidelines were created by a collaboration of people from around the world (the Web Accessibility Initiative) to ensure that people of all walks of life can enjoy the Internet.

With proper consideration, the web designs you create will enable those websites to be visited and enjoyed by everyone!

An Interview with Artist Brian McCall, part 2 of 2

written by Editor Georgia Schumacher 14 August 2014

Interview conducted by Mary Clare (MC)
Graphic Design Faculty Member
Published as part of the Artist Interview Series

Brian McCall (BM) is an artist who uses a variety of media to tell his stories. See part 1 of this interview here.

Artwork: The Band

Tim Gruber 3

Herd of Philosophers, detail image

MC: What role does the artist have in society?
BM: This portends the question of the meaning of life. The one aspect of being an artist that I cherish is 'I get to make things' that have never been seen before. Ernest Becker says the artist makes an object and throws it into the abyss and hopes it makes a difference. That's all we have, the hope that it makes a difference. We make things.

Art, Titled: The Snake in Any Story

MC: Did you ever have an idea that you rendered in one medium that you would like to redo in another? Why?
BM: Decisions have to be made, failures happen all the time, so you begin again. Sometimes you pick up a different tool and begin the process again.

MC: How would you describe your creative process, and approach to creating/designing?
BM: Regurgitation. Look at what comes up and see if there's anything new and spewed on the paper. Keep an open mind to your limitations; smile and jump back into the process.

MC: What has been your creative inspiration with type and other areas?
BM: There's a lot of comic artist in me. I enjoy balloons and words popping out. I'm a great admirer of the modern comic and the layout of a dynamic page.

MC: What have been your artistic influences?
BM: Marisio Lazansky's 'Nazi Drawings

MC: What’s the best piece of advice you’ve been given?
BM: Keep track of every pitch. Try to discern the pattern of the catcher and pitcher and how they're pitching to you.

MC: Who or what is your muse?
BM: Keith Jarret and his Sun Bear Concerts

MC: What new type of projects do you have in the works?
BM: The importance of being no one, size makes no difference says Masters and Johnson, and animation.

MC: Describe yourself in three words.
BM: Self reflectively blind

MC: What advice would you give a student studying art and design?
BM: Don't please anyone else, please yourself. Just be honest and hold yourself to the highest standard.

View more of Brian’s work at http://www.flickr.com/photos/brianmccall/.