3 Photography Blogs for You to Follow

written by Georgia Schumacher 20 November 2014

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First Years' Focus and Fire

http://firstyearsfocusandfire.blogspot.com/

Melanie Fiander is a senior full-time faculty member at The Art Institute of Pittsburgh -- Online Division, where she teaches photography and time-based media. Her blog, First Years’ Focus and Fire, is intended to supplement what students can learn in the first few years of their diploma, associate’s degree, or bachelor’s degree program. She typically publishes three posts per week:

Make it Mondays, with tutorials, advice for class, photographers tips, and more
Website Wednesdays, which highlights a variety of educational and inspirational sites
Pho-Tog Fridays, which can introduce you to new and talented photographers

The Blog of Professor Phillips

http://professorphillips.blogspot.com/

Stephen John Phillips is a faculty member teaching photography at The Art Institute of Pittsburgh -- Online Division as well as a freelance photo illustrator. He has been teaching and taking photographs for over 30 years. His blog is intended for those students who have graduated recently as well as those nearing graduation, with the goal of helping these individuals prepare to enter photography careers.

To name just a few, his clients have included:

• The Baltimore Sun
• Crown Random House
• The Discovery Channel Magazine
• Marvel Comics
• The Maryland Ballet
• Simpson Racing (NASCAR)
• World Wildlife Fund

Student Ambassador's Blog

http://pspnmentor.blogspot.com/

The Photography Students Professional Network regularly selects current students to write for this blog as Student Ambassadors. The posts on this blog include helpful advice on coursework, photography projects, online communication, and more! Every day of the week typically has an assigned ambassador, so readers get to hear from a variety of people with diverse opinions and interests!

Check out these blogs or explore our programs in the area of photography today!

The Art Institute of Pittsburgh - Online Division is not responsible for the content or accuracy of any website linked to this website/newsletter. The links are provided for your information and convenience only. The Art Institute of Pittsburgh - Online Division does not endorse, support or sponsor the content of any linked websites. If you access or use any third party Web sites linked to The Art Institute of Pittsburgh - Online Division’s website, you do so at your own risk. The Art Institute of Pittsburgh - Online Division makes no representation or warranty that any other Web site is free from viruses, worms or other software that may have a destructive nature.

A Thank You to Veterans

written by Georgia Schumacher 11 November 2014

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This Veterans Day, The Art Institute of Pittsburgh - Online Division extends our gratitude to all those who have served in the U.S. military—including our many brave military students, faculty, and staff—for their courage, commitment, and patriotism. We remember and honor these individuals for the numerous ways they have made our world a better place throughout history.

Today and every day, our faculty and staff are committed to supporting each of our military-affiliated students as they prepare to pursue rewarding creative careers. Last month, The Art Institute of Pittsburgh - Online Division was honored to be named a 2015 Military Friendly® School, and we remain dedicated to offering flexible degree programs, scholarship opportunities, academic support, and transfer of credit policies that can help make education more affordable and attainable for all students.

At The Art Institute of Pittsburgh - Online Division, military students are encouraged to join our chapter of the Student Veterans of America in Connections (under the Organizations tab), a network where peers can provide academic and personal support, share helpful information, and discuss a wide range of topics and common interests. We also encourage military students to explore the resources and organizations available via the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

Thank you again for the sacrifices you have made and all that you have done for this country!

3 Clues to Building Better Photographer-Client Relationships

written by Georgia Schumacher 6 November 2014

While interacting with your clients can be a blast, photographers also regularly face challenges in this aspect of their job. Since clients aren't usually models or actors, a photographer can't assume their clients will know what to expect or how to act. It's one thing to give directions—such as telling them to act naturally—and another thing to get a natural-looking photo. The camera might not actually add pounds, but it does often produce insecurity and doubt.

Here are a few tips for those pursuing photography careers or taking photography classes to help you create a positive space for your clients to feel at ease.

Photographer with Bridal Client

1. Get to know each other

You will likely need to break the ice to get your client comfortable in front of the camera. Clients who don't know their photographers well are more likely to reserve their emotions when the flash goes off. For this reason, it's important to establish a personal relationship before moving on to planning the photo shoot. When director Christopher Nolan met with Matthew McConaughey for Interstellar, the two spent hours talking about everything except the movie. This, Nolan explained, was to get a feel for the relationship he and his future star would have while shooting.

2. Set the right expectations

When it's time to discuss business, set positive expectations for your clients. Don't make promises you can't keep, or otherwise set yourself (and the client) up for major disappointment. It's always better to over-deliver than to over-promise.

Talk with your clients either on the phone or in person beforehand in order to go over their expectations. What are your plans for the photos as the photographer? What do they expect from working with you? Discover a theme or mood your clients are getting at, or offer your own themes based on what you glean from the conversation.

From there, you can ask if there are any props or particular wardrobe choices they may like to incorporate. If it's a group shot, you might advise a certain color scheme for them to follow but to wear whatever makes them comfortable. This helps them relax because they'll be more prepared and will know exactly what to expect. Also, let them pick the location for the shoot, whether at their home or in a public place such as a park or a beach. This way, they'll feel at ease in their surroundings.

3. Bring them into the process

On the day of the actual shoot, get there early to set up. When your clients arrive, explain the kind of shots you plan to take and give them a timeline for the process. Show them the props, how you plan to incorporate them, and let them choose which ones they'd like to use. This interaction allows them to feel included and in control of the process. Your clients can now begin to feel like collaborators rather than just another prop.

To learn more about photography, explore our online degree programs and see what you could be learning in our photography classes!

What do your color choices say about your brand?

written by Georgia Schumacher 21 October 2014

Color is more than just a personal choice when creating art, or designing advertising and marketing materials. Every color choice makes an emotional impact on the viewer and can cement the understanding of a brand in consumers' minds.

Colors

Warm versus cool colors

Typically, colors are divided into two groups: cool colors and warm colors. Warm colors, like red, orange, yellow, gold, and brown, typically make you think of heat or light. Cool colors, on the other hand, are associated with tranquility and nature—colors like blue, green, purple, and grey. Cooler colors are found on the lower right hand of the color wheel while the warmer colors are on the upper left hand of the color wheel.

Choosing colors from one group or another can change how the viewer feels about a painting, product or brand. For example, say you are creating a logo for a company that sells blankets. To convey a sense of warmth, you might choose a color from the warm color palette. On the other hand, if you are creating a logo for a snow cone company, you want a color that feels chilly, like blue. Colors like blue, green and purple can literally make people feel colder.

Saturation

How these colors affect viewers has a lot to do with how bright or saturated they are. For example, red can be a very stimulating color, but if you bring down the saturation, the viewer may associate the color with a sense of calm.

Color by color

Psychology studies have shown that different colors have different affects on humans. Here are a few:

• Red raises blood pressure, encourages people to gamble more and is the color of love. 
• Blue is calming and is one of the most popular colors in the world.
• Orange makes people think of bargains.
• Green van spark creativity and outside-the-box thinking.
• People often think of boredom or cleanliness when they think of white.
• Black is thought of as sophisticated.

No matter if you are into fine art, design or marketing, considering color psychology can help you to convey your intentions to the viewer. When choosing colors, always think about your product and service and find colors that make sense for you!

The Art Institute of Pittsburgh – Online Division Named a 2015 Military Friendly® School

written by Georgia Schumacher 15 October 2014

LogoThe Art Institute of Pittsburgh – Online Division is honored to have been named a 2015 Military Friendly® School by Victory Media, the publisher of G.I. Jobs, Military Spouse, and Vetrepreneur® magazines.

The Military Friendly® Schools designation is awarded to the top 15% of colleges, universities, and trade schools in the country that are doing the most to embrace military students, and to dedicate resources to ensure their success in the classroom and after graduation. In total, the survey captures over 50 leading practices in supporting military students. Now in its sixth year, the Military Friendly® Schools designation and list provides service members transparent, data-driven ratings about post-military education.

At The Art Institute of Pittsburgh – Online Division, we strongly value the commitment to our country made by military members and veterans. As part of our efforts to recognize the commitment and service of these students, we are proud to offer qualifying students numerous military education benefits, including a military scholarship. We also offer all military students a comprehensive review of their military experience and training to determine eligibility for transfer of credit toward our programs.

“The Art Institute of Pittsburgh – Online Division is proud to announce that we have been awarded Military Friendly® status once again for 2014-2015,” said Brandon Corley, Director of Student Financial Services. “We are honored to service the millions of active and veteran service members along with their families. We are committed to dedicating resources and staff to serve as military experts and to ensure that these service members receive the highest level of personalized customer service.”

For more information about our commitment to educating and supporting military students, visit http://www.aionline.edu/tuition/military-aid/.