A Look at the Future of Photography

written by Georgia Schumacher 21 February 2012

Welcome to part 2 in our series looking at the future of some of the occupational fields related to our program at The Art Institute of Pittsburgh – Online Division. Today we’re going to take a look at some trends in outlooks in the field of Photography.

As anyone who has been paying attention can tell you, the world of Photography has undergone tremendous changes over the last several years. With the advent of digital photography and improving technologies, photographers face a very different landscape than they did 10 or 20 years ago.

Photography Programs

These changes have obviously affected the career outlook for the professional photographer. As the Bureau of Labor Statistics put it in their outlook:

"Employment of photographers is expected to grow 12 percent over the 2008-18 period, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Demand for portrait photographers should increase as the population grows. Moreover, growth of Internet versions of magazines, journals, and newspapers will require increasing numbers of commercial photographers to provide digital images. The Internet and improved data management programs also should make it easier for freelancers to market directly to their customers, increasing opportunities for self-employment and decreasing reliance on stock photo agencies.

"Job growth, however, will be constrained somewhat by the widespread use of digital photography and the falling price of digital equipment. Improvements in digital technology reduce barriers of entry into this profession and allow more individual consumers and businesses to produce, store, and access photographic images on their own."

With these changes to the industry, what are some of the best practices for the aspiring photographer? As with any career where there is expected to be a lot of competition, being dedicated to excellence in your field is a best practice that should always be regarded. You can hear it directly from two of the most successful photographers working today as they discuss their advice for the future, Chase Jarvis and Albert Watson.

Also, if you’re interested in how the technology of the camera has changed over the years and what may lie ahead, this examination of the past and future of cameras may be of interest to you.

For more information on the photography industry, you may want to consult the Professional Photographers Association of America, or explore the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ full page on the career outlook for Photography.

Stay tuned for part 3 of our series, a look at the future of graphic design.